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Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Alexander von Taysen
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Alexander von Taysen:

Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Taschenbuch

2003, ISBN: 3838665406

ID: 12059030186

[EAN: 9783838665405], Libro nuovo, [SC: 7.95], [PU: Diplom.De Mrz 2003], This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. Neuware - Master's Thesis from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: 1,0, University of Sussex (International Commercial Law, Graduate Research Center for Legal Studies), language: English, abstract: Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: Globalisation has been narrowly defined as the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations . The resulting imbalance in the relation of global markets on the one hand, and national regulation of socio-economic systems on the other, poses problems in all fields, not least in the protection of the environment. The activities of the oil company Shell in Nigeria and in the Brent Spar case were put in the international spotlight as high-profile examples for the environmentally damaging activities of multinational corporations. These cases not only showed the complexity of structures of responsibility in these enterprises, but also the impact of naming and shaming campaigns by non-governmental organizations. An enterprise becomes multinational if it realizes foreign direct investment (FDI), which occurs when residents of one country acquire control over a business enterprise in another country (by contrast to long-term portfolio investment without the control effect and short-term capital flows). FDI itself is (1) investment made outside the home country of the investing company, but inside the investing company. Control over the use of the resources transferred remains with the investor. (2) It consists of a package of assets and intermediate products, such as capital, technology, management skills, access to markets and entrepreneurship In 1996, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the UN body occupied with, inter alia, investment issues, counted approximately 38,700 major companies with control over 265,000 affiliates abroad. Headquarters of multinational enterprises (MNEs) are seated in fifty-nine countries (8% in the United States, 11% in developing countries). The 100 biggest MNEs, however, are all seated in 13 developed countries, which are organized in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). While environmental regulation has been a constant topic in national economies, its internationalization began 30 years ago at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. On the international political level, the situation is dominated by an argument between the rich north , driven by the goal of prosperity and a strong sensitiveness for environmental issues, and the poor south claiming a right to economic development without the burden of high environmental standards. On the legal front, two regimes oppose each other, the economic regime around the WTO rules and the environmental regime in such fields as climate change and biodiversity. Economic growth and the protection of the environment are the two ends of a debate with multinational enterprises in its center. For a better understanding of the background of the debate, some economic aspects must be presented. The operations of modern MNEs depend on an international economic order based on free trade and the free flow of investment. Open markets enable them to establish affiliates in other countries and to profit from the possibility of worldwide production. The international environmental regime has a great impact on MNEs as well. If states, in compliance with their international environmental obligations, impose stricter legislation on production methods or products, the costs of production rise. The resulting effect on profits affect the decision of MNEs where to invest. According to economic theory, countries with relatively low input costs, for example because of lower health and environmental standards, have a comparative advantage over countries with high standards and att. 72 pp. Englisch

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Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Alexander von Taysen
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)

Alexander von Taysen:

Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Taschenbuch

2003, ISBN: 3838665406

ID: 12059030186

[EAN: 9783838665405], Neubuch, [PU: Diplom.De Mrz 2003], This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. Neuware - Master's Thesis from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: 1,0, University of Sussex (International Commercial Law, Graduate Research Center for Legal Studies), language: English, abstract: Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: Globalisation has been narrowly defined as the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations . The resulting imbalance in the relation of global markets on the one hand, and national regulation of socio-economic systems on the other, poses problems in all fields, not least in the protection of the environment. The activities of the oil company Shell in Nigeria and in the Brent Spar case were put in the international spotlight as high-profile examples for the environmentally damaging activities of multinational corporations. These cases not only showed the complexity of structures of responsibility in these enterprises, but also the impact of naming and shaming campaigns by non-governmental organizations. An enterprise becomes multinational if it realizes foreign direct investment (FDI), which occurs when residents of one country acquire control over a business enterprise in another country (by contrast to long-term portfolio investment without the control effect and short-term capital flows). FDI itself is (1) investment made outside the home country of the investing company, but inside the investing company. Control over the use of the resources transferred remains with the investor. (2) It consists of a package of assets and intermediate products, such as capital, technology, management skills, access to markets and entrepreneurship In 1996, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the UN body occupied with, inter alia, investment issues, counted approximately 38,700 major companies with control over 265,000 affiliates abroad. Headquarters of multinational enterprises (MNEs) are seated in fifty-nine countries (8% in the United States, 11% in developing countries). The 100 biggest MNEs, however, are all seated in 13 developed countries, which are organized in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). While environmental regulation has been a constant topic in national economies, its internationalization began 30 years ago at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. On the international political level, the situation is dominated by an argument between the rich north , driven by the goal of prosperity and a strong sensitiveness for environmental issues, and the poor south claiming a right to economic development without the burden of high environmental standards. On the legal front, two regimes oppose each other, the economic regime around the WTO rules and the environmental regime in such fields as climate change and biodiversity. Economic growth and the protection of the environment are the two ends of a debate with multinational enterprises in its center. For a better understanding of the background of the debate, some economic aspects must be presented. The operations of modern MNEs depend on an international economic order based on free trade and the free flow of investment. Open markets enable them to establish affiliates in other countries and to profit from the possibility of worldwide production. The international environmental regime has a great impact on MNEs as well. If states, in compliance with their international environmental obligations, impose stricter legislation on production methods or products, the costs of production rise. The resulting effect on profits affect the decision of MNEs where to invest. According to economic theory, countries with relatively low input costs, for example because of lower health and environmental standards, have a comparative advantage over countries with high standards and att. 72 pp. Englisch

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Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - von Taysen, Alexander
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
von Taysen, Alexander:
Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Taschenbuch

2003

ISBN: 9783838665405

[ED: Softcover], [PU: Grin Verlag Diplom.De], Master's Thesis from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: 1,0, University of Sussex (International Commercial Law, Graduate Research Center for Legal Studies), language: English, abstract: Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: Globalisation has been narrowly defined as the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations . The resulting imbalance in the relation of global markets on the one hand, and national regulation of socio-economic systems on the other, poses problems in all fields, not least in the protection of the environment. The activities of the oil company Shell in Nigeria and in the Brent Spar case were put in the international spotlight as high-profile examples for the environmentally damaging activities of multinational corporations. These cases not only showed the complexity of structures of responsibility in these enterprises, but also the impact of naming and shaming campaigns by non-governmental organizations. An enterprise becomes multinational if it realizes foreign direct investment (FDI), which occurs when residents of one country acquire control over a business enterprise in another country (by contrast to long-term portfolio investment without the control effect and short-term capital flows). FDI itself is (1) investment made outside the home country of the investing company, but inside the investing company. Control over the use of the resources transferred remains with the investor. (2) It consists of a package of assets and intermediate products, such as capital, technology, management skills, access to markets and entrepreneurship In 1996, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the UN body occupied with, inter alia, investment issues, counted approximately 38,700 major companies with control over 265,000 affiliates abroad. Headquarters of multinational enterprises (MNEs) are seated in fifty-nine countries (8% in the United States, 11% in developing countries). The 100 biggest MNEs, however, are all seated in 13 developed countries, which are organized in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). While environmental regulation has been a constant topic in national economies, its internationalization began 30 years ago at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. On the international political level, the situation is dominated by an argument between the rich north , driven by the goal of prosperity and a strong sensitiveness for environmental issues, and the poor south claiming a right to economic development without the burden of high environmental standards. On the legal front, two regimes oppose each other, the economic regime around the WTO rules and the environmental regime in such fields as climate change and biodiversity. Economic growth and the protection of the environment are the two ends of a debate with multinational enterprises in its center. For a better understanding of the background of the debate, some economic aspects must be presented. The operations of modern MNEs depend on an international economic order based on free trade and the free flow of investment. Open markets enable them to establish affiliates in other countries and to profit from the possibility of worldwide production. The international environmental regime has a great impact on MNEs as well. If states, in compliance with their international environmental obligations, impose stricter legislation on production methods or products, the costs of production rise. The resulting effect on profits affect the decision of MNEs where to invest. According to economic theory, countries with relatively low input costs, for example because of lower health and environmental standards, have a comparative advantage over countries with high standards and att... 2003. 72 S. 210 mm Versandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot

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Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Alexander von Taysen
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Alexander von Taysen:
Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Taschenbuch

2003, ISBN: 3838665406

ID: 12059030186

[EAN: 9783838665405], Neubuch, [PU: Diplom.De Mrz 2003], This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. Neuware - Master's Thesis from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: 1,0, University of Sussex (International Commercial Law, Graduate Research Center for Legal Studies), language: English, abstract: Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: ¿Globalisation¿ has been narrowly defined as ¿the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations¿. The resulting imbalance in the relation of global markets on the one hand, and national regulation of socio-economic systems on the other, poses problems in all fields, not least in the protection of the environment. The activities of the oil company Shell in Nigeria and in the Brent Spar case were put in the international spotlight as high-profile examples for the environmentally damaging activities of multinational corporations. These cases not only showed the complexity of structures of responsibility in these enterprises, but also the impact of ¿naming and shaming¿ campaigns by non-governmental organizations. An enterprise becomes multinational if it realizes foreign direct investment (FDI), which occurs when residents of one country acquire control over a business enterprise in another country (by contrast to long-term portfolio investment ¿ without the control effect ¿ and short-term capital flows). FDI itself is ¿(1) ¿ investment ¿ made outside the home country of the investing company, but inside the investing company. Control over the use of the resources transferred remains with the investor. (2) It consists of a ¿package¿ of assets and intermediate products, such as capital, technology, management skills, access to markets and entrepreneurship¿ In 1996, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the UN body occupied with, inter alia, investment issues, counted approximately 38,700 major companies with control over 265,000 affiliates abroad. Headquarters of multinational enterprises (MNEs) are seated in fifty-nine countries (8% in the United States, 11% in developing countries). The 100 biggest MNEs, however, are all seated in 13 developed countries, which are organized in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). While environmental regulation has been a constant topic in national economies, its internationalization began 30 years ago at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. On the international political level, the situation is dominated by an argument between the rich ¿north¿, driven by the goal of prosperity and a strong sensitiveness for environmental issues, and the poor ¿south¿ claiming a right to economic development without the burden of high environmental standards. On the legal front, two regimes oppose each other, the economic regime around the WTO rules and the environmental regime in such fields as climate change and biodiversity. Economic growth and the protection of the environment are the two ends of a debate with multinational enterprises in its center. For a better understanding of the background of the debate, some economic aspects must be presented. The operations of modern MNEs depend on an international economic order based on free trade and the free flow of investment. Open markets enable them to establish affiliates in other countries and to profit from the possibility of worldwide production. The international environmental regime has a great impact on MNEs as well. If states, in compliance with their international environmental obligations, impose stricter legislation on production methods or products, the costs of production rise. The resulting effect on profits affect the decision of MNEs where to invest. According to economic theory, countries with relatively low input costs, for example because of lower health and environmental standards, have a comparative advantage over countries with high standards and att. 72

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AHA-BUCH GmbH, Einbeck, NDS, Germany [51283250] [Rating: 5 (von 5)]
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(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - von Taysen, Alexander
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
von Taysen, Alexander:
Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards - Taschenbuch

2003, ISBN: 9783838665405

[ED: Softcover], [PU: Grin Verlag Diplom.De], Master's Thesis from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: 1,0, University of Sussex (International Commercial Law, Graduate Research Center for Legal Studies), language: English, abstract: Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: Globalisation has been narrowly defined as the free movement of capital and the increasing domination of national economies by global financial markets and multinational corporations. The resulting imbalance in the relation of global markets on the one hand, and national regulation of socio-economic systems on the other, poses problems in all fields, not least in the protection of the environment. The activities of the oil company Shell in Nigeria and in the Brent Spar case were put in the international spotlight as high-profile examples for the environmentally damaging activities of multinational corporations. These cases not only showed the complexity of structures of responsibility in these enterprises, but also the impact of naming and shaming campaigns by non-governmental organizations. An enterprise becomes multinational if it realizes foreign direct investment (FDI), which occurs when residents of one country acquire control over a business enterprise in another country (by contrast to long-term portfolio investment without the control effect and short-term capital flows). FDI itself is (1) investment made outside the home country of the investing company, but inside the investing company. Control over the use of the resources transferred remains with the investor. (2) It consists of a package of assets and intermediate products, such as capital, technology, management skills, access to markets and entrepreneurship In 1996, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the UN body occupied with, inter alia, investment issues, counted approximately 38,700 major companies with control over 265,000 affiliates abroad. Headquarters of multinational enterprises (MNEs) are seated in fifty-nine countries (8% in the United States, 11% in developing countries). The 100 biggest MNEs, however, are all seated in 13 developed countries, which are organized in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). While environmental regulation has been a constant topic in national economies, its internationalization began 30 years ago at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. On the international political level, the situation is dominated by an argument between the rich north, driven by the goal of prosperity and a strong sensitiveness for environmental issues, and the poor south claiming a right to economic development without the burden of high environmental standards. On the legal front, two regimes oppose each other, the economic regime around the WTO rules and the environmental regime in such fields as climate change and biodiversity. Economic growth and the protection of the environment are the two ends of a debate with multinational enterprises in its center. For a better understanding of the background of the debate, some economic aspects must be presented. The operations of modern MNEs depend on an international economic order based on free trade and the free flow of investment. Open markets enable them to establish affiliates in other countries and to profit from the possibility of worldwide production. The international environmental regime has a great impact on MNEs as well. If states, in compliance with their international environmental obligations, impose stricter legislation on production methods or products, the costs of production rise. The resulting effect on profits affect the decision of MNEs where to invest. According to economic theory, countries with relatively low input costs, for example because of lower health and environmental standards, have a comparative advantage over countries with high standards and att...2003. 72 S. 210 mmVersandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, [SC: 0.00]

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Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards: Which Regulation for foreign Direct Investment?
Autor:

Alexander von Taysen

Titel:

Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards: Which Regulation for foreign Direct Investment?

ISBN-Nummer:

3838665406

Detailangaben zum Buch - Multinational Enterprises and Environmental Standards: Which Regulation for foreign Direct Investment?


EAN (ISBN-13): 9783838665405
ISBN (ISBN-10): 3838665406
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2002
Herausgeber: Diplom.De Mrz 2003

Buch in der Datenbank seit 19.03.2009 13:24:29
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 02.08.2016 10:59:14
ISBN/EAN: 3838665406

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
3-8386-6540-6, 978-3-8386-6540-5

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